Changing The World

Changing The World
by D.K.Dykema

 

                Young people characteristically have the passion to change the world.  Every new generation catches a fever of reform, thinking itself  original and enlightened. Many anoint themselves as mod prophets who write slogans and call for protest and revolution.  Dutiful recruits often dress funny and scrawl graffiti on the establishment wall.  More careful youngsters learn to appreciate their aging superiors and patiently recommend needed reforms.

                The young, often divide themselves into two diverse groups.  Not many stay in the middle of the road.  Either they brandish their resignation from life, are cynical and won’t get involved in the day-to-day grind of world rescue, or they are into all the current trends and eco-philosophies.  Cynics may withdraw because of laziness or confusion, but deep down, the urge for change is secretly nursed.  It is perceived as the real authenticator, the daring font of identity.  Joiners and revolutionaries often choose sides with one of the current rockers or rappers.  They argue with their elders about justice and fairness.  Inexperience offers no barrier to nerve.

                The young are not alone in this crusade.  A most recent example of the fervid aspiration to save the world comes from one of the most distinctly “establishment” of all industries, the computer wizards.  Those who played prime roles of innovation, design and manufacture of this wonderful tool, notwithstanding their private jets and costly mansions, speak of a disinterest in money.  Almost to a man, they tell of their disdain for high salary.  Theirs is a driving concern for changing the world.  They’re serious.  Some still dress in the accredited uniform of the nerd, wear their hair in a pony-tail or refuse a striped tie, but they all chant about their vision for change.

 

 

Changing The World And Running Shoes

                What is the meaning of all this world changing fervor?  Why does life mean nothing if it’s not spent on global alteration?  How do tennis shoes and slippery short pants signify progressive cosmic mutation?  Why is brand name clothing sold by means of revolutionary mottoes?

                 It’s revealing to examine this savior complex, these divine claims of man trying to play God.  The scene often includes carrying a divine cape in a back-pack.  Planet preservation and improvement may be the most important industry.

 

Humanism, The Great Pretender

                At the temptation of our Lord, the Devil brought no alternate plan.  Having no imagination of his own, he could only propose transparent compromise and concession.  He presented a deal whereby the Son of God would take the painless route to cosmic reclamation.  Avoiding the arduous and bloody route of the cross, He could supposedly win the day in league with the opposition.  [Matt.4:1-11]

                Humanism mimics the claims and objectives of the Holy Scriptures.  Man’s religion is not capable of choreographing a plan of its own.  The matter comes to the fore throughout history by means of incessant complaint and demand for revolt and upheaval.  As if mankind could judge with an even hand, a controversy about fairness is perpetuated on all levels of life and activity.  The boss is a fool, neighbors are inferior, the king is a tyrant, parents were partial, the wife is a hag, alas, I (man) alone can bear this awful load to the finish.  I, alone, will have to make sense of this jumble.  I, alone, can overcome.

                The God-given idealism of the young makes them especially vulnerable to this bogus plea.  Young hearts are fallen too.  Older, more experienced people bear extended guilt.  Theirs is a more considered and dastardly mutiny.  It has the impress of the Devil’s  spurious argument, We can save mankind if we work together, so just bow this once, make the trivial gesture, and we can reign together in the guise of harmony.

                An exaggerated concern for others is often the mask of a thief.  All have the stripe of Robin and wish to provide for the maimed and needy in Sherwood.  Let us all have one purse, is their deceptive refrain.  [Prov.1:14]

 

Christ, the Only World Changer

                The yearning to change things is okay when it reflects the desire to turn from evil, but it is destructive when merely an empty expression of man.  When the young begin to perceive the stench of death and the strain of disobedience, their dissatisfaction glorifies God.  If their dissatisfaction is mere selfish complaint and pride, it only adds to the statis quo.  If the Spirit of God intervenes with saving grace, the matter takes on a entirely new complexion.

                Real change is not what the politicians and media describe.  It cannot come through better (humanistic) education or social programs.  More money, better health and anti-drug programs will not affect real change.  Calling for Jehad or bombing those who don’t agree is the response of the pagan.  Man is impotent to bring about genuine reformation.  Only Jesus’ blood and righteousness, focused and applied by the Holy Spirit, can change the world, and that by changing the hearts of people.  Home education, with Christ at the center, is a major step ahead in the advance of Christ’s Kingdom.  The prayer, Thy Kingdom come . . . is partly fulfilled in the rebuilding of the family.

                Changing the world is a popular hoax when screamed from the modern stage or blasted from van-sized speakers.  It is a common swindle, suggested even in much current advertising.  The reason for its success has, primarily to do with the underlying witness that stirs the heart of every man . . . the one that causes him to suppress the truth in unrighteousness.  [Rom.1:18]  The drive for change wrests the hearts of young people because they are beginning to acknowledge the depth of the need within.  Desire for change is not wrong  in itself.  Wrong happens when change is sought apart from the Lord of Glory.               

 

 

 
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